• 2013.

Our 2013 Year in Review is live! We’ve had great fun putting it together and trust you’ll enjoy taking a look back at the year that was.

Our approach

As we did last year, we made some choices regarding which films were eligible in each category. Documentaries have their own category and don’t also appear in the top-rated list, which we restricted to narrative films only. Animated films were included in the top-rated list but not in other genres, and foreign-language films were included in all genres.

Where possible, we’ve included films that had a US theatrical release (limited or otherwise) in 2013 — plus the last week of 2012, as noted below — except for the ‘Ones to Watch’ category, which collects the highest-rated 2013 releases (including at festivals) that were watched by only a small number of members.

Drama and comedy proved too difficult to accurately categorize, but you can see what featured highly in these genres, based on our TMDb tags, in the Films browser. There’s a number of ways to slice and dice our film listings in that section, if you haven’t taken a look there yet.

We stuck to feature-length films in all categories, which meant the exclusion of all short films, as well as the 400-minute documentary Crystal Lake Memories: The Complete History of Friday the 13th.

For ‘Most Divisive’ we used a minimum threshold of the number of views, to highlight the year’s more popular films that divided audiences. The ‘Most Loved to Hate’ category is based on the number of low ratings that were also accompanied by a ‘like’ from the same member.

And in the acting and directing categories, we only included appearances in 2013 releases (plus Django) which is a change from last year, but will give more varied results year on year (with apologies to Sam Jackson, who would likely win it every year otherwise).

The Django situation

Yes, Django Unchained is officially a 2012 release, but we included it because its Boxing Day US theatrical release meant it didn’t make it into last year’s review (published December 23rd), and it didn’t feel right to exclude it outright. Besides which, the film cast a long shadow over the first half of the year, holding a top-five spot from January through May, as you’ll see in the month-by-month popularity charts.

Thanks to our Patrons

Many thanks to our Patrons, who have been previewing the page over the past week and provided plenty of useful feedback.

We won’t spoil the results, so head over to letterboxd.com/2013/ and enjoy! If you have a keyboard, your up/down arrow keys will work to skip to each screen. And members, make sure you’re signed in first if you want to take advantage of the poster menus to add films to your Watchlist and so forth.

If you just can’t get enough, we’ve published extended lists for the major categories. Go crazy. Tell your friends. Throw out a tweet. Happy new year!

    2013.

    Our 2013 Year in Review is live! We’ve had great fun putting it together and trust you’ll enjoy taking a look back at the year that was.

    Our approach

    As we did last year, we made some choices regarding which films were eligible in each category. Documentaries have their own category and don’t also appear in the top-rated list, which we restricted to narrative films only. Animated films were included in the top-rated list but not in other genres, and foreign-language films were included in all genres.

    Where possible, we’ve included films that had a US theatrical release (limited or otherwise) in 2013 — plus the last week of 2012, as noted below — except for the ‘Ones to Watch’ category, which collects the highest-rated 2013 releases (including at festivals) that were watched by only a small number of members.

    Drama and comedy proved too difficult to accurately categorize, but you can see what featured highly in these genres, based on our TMDb tags, in the Films browser. There’s a number of ways to slice and dice our film listings in that section, if you haven’t taken a look there yet.

    We stuck to feature-length films in all categories, which meant the exclusion of all short films, as well as the 400-minute documentary Crystal Lake Memories: The Complete History of Friday the 13th.

    For ‘Most Divisive’ we used a minimum threshold of the number of views, to highlight the year’s more popular films that divided audiences. The ‘Most Loved to Hate’ category is based on the number of low ratings that were also accompanied by a ‘like’ from the same member.

    And in the acting and directing categories, we only included appearances in 2013 releases (plus Django) which is a change from last year, but will give more varied results year on year (with apologies to Sam Jackson, who would likely win it every year otherwise).

    The Django situation

    Yes, Django Unchained is officially a 2012 release, but we included it because its Boxing Day US theatrical release meant it didn’t make it into last year’s review (published December 23rd), and it didn’t feel right to exclude it outright. Besides which, the film cast a long shadow over the first half of the year, holding a top-five spot from January through May, as you’ll see in the month-by-month popularity charts.

    Thanks to our Patrons

    Many thanks to our Patrons, who have been previewing the page over the past week and provided plenty of useful feedback.

    We won’t spoil the results, so head over to letterboxd.com/2013/ and enjoy! If you have a keyboard, your up/down arrow keys will work to skip to each screen. And members, make sure you’re signed in first if you want to take advantage of the poster menus to add films to your Watchlist and so forth.

    If you just can’t get enough, we’ve published extended lists for the major categories. Go crazy. Tell your friends. Throw out a tweet. Happy new year!

  • Sharing.

Hello! Here’s a quick note about some new updates we have for you in the run up to the end of the year, with apologies to David Fincher.

Firstly, you might have noticed we’ve been beta testing tighter Facebook integration. To enable this optional, automated sharing you must first connect your Facebook account to Letterboxd in Settings. Once you’ve enabled this connection, you’ll see sharing options in two places: when making or editing diary entries, and when creating or updating a list. This is explicit sharing, which requires you to opt in to having your content published to your Facebook timeline. We remember your preference each time you create new content, so it’s easy to leave this setting on (or off) and we’ll do the rest.

You’ll note in Settings that we also offer you the ability to send ratings, likes and Watchlist activity to Facebook. This is implicit sharing and once you enable it, Letterboxd sends relevant activity to Facebook as you perform actions on our site. For example, if you rate a film while creating a diary entry, but choose not to publish the entry to Facebook explicitly, your rating is still sent if implicit sharing is on.

By default we push activity to a ‘Letterboxd’ collection accessible from your Facebook profile page, but you can also allow this activity to populate your main ‘Movies’ collection (‘Films’ in the UK) by selecting the ‘Add movies from Letterboxd and other apps’ option in your Movies collection on Facebook — you may need to click the collection’s title in your Facebook profile sidebar to see this option.

All of the aforementioned sharing options are OPT-IN — we don’t send anything to Facebook unless you authorize us to (and you can disable it whenever you like). We’re still testing this, and isolating issues with it can be a tricky business, but if you have feedback after using it, please let us know. (Also note: at this time we do not send historical data to Facebook, only new activity on your account.)

Year to date

From today, Pro and Patron members can see how their full year is shaping up, and start to think about their year-end lists. You’ll see we’ve amended the year in review option on your profile page to show all years in which you’ve made at least ten diary entries. These pages no longer require manual publication either, they’re updated automatically whenever you perform relevant actions on the site.

Reminder: a 1-year Pro or Patron membership is required to get your personalized year in review, and this is enabled for all years as long as your membership remains active.

Tag auto-completion



When making diary entries and lists, the tag field now auto-completes from all previous tags you’ve used. On devices with a keyboard, you can press Tab to auto-complete the suggested match, or use the cursor keys to navigate to another suggestion. To create a new tag without auto-completing, press Return. And tags can now be removed by clicking them in the editing interface.

A better watchlist

We’ve made some additions to everyone’s Watchlists: genre and decade filtering is now supported, and around the site you can now hide films that are in your Watchlist, in addition to hiding unreleased and short films, or those you have (or haven’t) watched.

And by popular request, Pro and Patron members can now import to their watchlist using the same formats we support for import elsewhere in the site. Read more about our import format.

Other improvements

A few other items of note:

The ‘I’ve seen this film before’ option when saving a diary entry is now smart, and will select itself if you have prior entries for the same film (yeah, finally).
If you make a diary entry without a review, but have previously reviewed the same film, we include the text of your prior review and a link (or just a link if the review contains spoilers).
Diary entries now appear in your profile’s RSS feed.
One more thing…

Oh, we nearly forgot. We’ve always sorted films by a popularity metric derived from the amount of activity for each film. In effect, a measure of quantity, not quality. From today, we’ve added the ability to sort relevant sections by highest or lowest rating! For example…

Letterboxd’s Highest Rated Films of All Time
By genre: Science Fiction, Horror, Documentary, et al.
By decade: 2010s, 2000s, 1990s, 1980s, et al.
Or how about: Worst Comedies of the 1970s…

Behind the scenes, we use a weighted average calculation similar to the one employed by IMDb and used in last year’s Year in Review.

We’re now starting to think about our 2013 year-end wrap up, and beyond. If there’s something you’d like to see, please drop us a line.

    Sharing.

    Hello! Here’s a quick note about some new updates we have for you in the run up to the end of the year, with apologies to David Fincher.

    Firstly, you might have noticed we’ve been beta testing tighter Facebook integration. To enable this optional, automated sharing you must first connect your Facebook account to Letterboxd in Settings. Once you’ve enabled this connection, you’ll see sharing options in two places: when making or editing diary entries, and when creating or updating a list. This is explicit sharing, which requires you to opt in to having your content published to your Facebook timeline. We remember your preference each time you create new content, so it’s easy to leave this setting on (or off) and we’ll do the rest.

    You’ll note in Settings that we also offer you the ability to send ratings, likes and Watchlist activity to Facebook. This is implicit sharing and once you enable it, Letterboxd sends relevant activity to Facebook as you perform actions on our site. For example, if you rate a film while creating a diary entry, but choose not to publish the entry to Facebook explicitly, your rating is still sent if implicit sharing is on.

    By default we push activity to a ‘Letterboxd’ collection accessible from your Facebook profile page, but you can also allow this activity to populate your main ‘Movies’ collection (‘Films’ in the UK) by selecting the ‘Add movies from Letterboxd and other apps’ option in your Movies collection on Facebook — you may need to click the collection’s title in your Facebook profile sidebar to see this option.

    All of the aforementioned sharing options are OPT-IN — we don’t send anything to Facebook unless you authorize us to (and you can disable it whenever you like). We’re still testing this, and isolating issues with it can be a tricky business, but if you have feedback after using it, please let us know. (Also note: at this time we do not send historical data to Facebook, only new activity on your account.)

    Year to date

    From today, Pro and Patron members can see how their full year is shaping up, and start to think about their year-end lists. You’ll see we’ve amended the year in review option on your profile page to show all years in which you’ve made at least ten diary entries. These pages no longer require manual publication either, they’re updated automatically whenever you perform relevant actions on the site.

    Reminder: a 1-year Pro or Patron membership is required to get your personalized year in review, and this is enabled for all years as long as your membership remains active.

    Tag auto-completion

    When making diary entries and lists, the tag field now auto-completes from all previous tags you’ve used. On devices with a keyboard, you can press Tab to auto-complete the suggested match, or use the cursor keys to navigate to another suggestion. To create a new tag without auto-completing, press Return. And tags can now be removed by clicking them in the editing interface.

    A better watchlist

    We’ve made some additions to everyone’s Watchlists: genre and decade filtering is now supported, and around the site you can now hide films that are in your Watchlist, in addition to hiding unreleased and short films, or those you have (or haven’t) watched.

    And by popular request, Pro and Patron members can now import to their watchlist using the same formats we support for import elsewhere in the site. Read more about our import format.

    Other improvements

    A few other items of note:

    • The ‘I’ve seen this film before’ option when saving a diary entry is now smart, and will select itself if you have prior entries for the same film (yeah, finally).
    • If you make a diary entry without a review, but have previously reviewed the same film, we include the text of your prior review and a link (or just a link if the review contains spoilers).
    • Diary entries now appear in your profile’s RSS feed.

    One more thing…

    Oh, we nearly forgot. We’ve always sorted films by a popularity metric derived from the amount of activity for each film. In effect, a measure of quantity, not quality. From today, we’ve added the ability to sort relevant sections by highest or lowest rating! For example…

    Letterboxd’s Highest Rated Films of All Time
    By genre: Science Fiction, Horror, Documentary, et al.
    By decade: 2010s, 2000s, 1990s, 1980s, et al.
    Or how about: Worst Comedies of the 1970s

    Behind the scenes, we use a weighted average calculation similar to the one employed by IMDb and used in last year’s Year in Review.

    We’re now starting to think about our 2013 year-end wrap up, and beyond. If there’s something you’d like to see, please drop us a line.

  • Big thanks to Film Comment magazine for this mention in their latest print edition!

    Big thanks to Film Comment magazine for this mention in their latest print edition!

  • Cloning.

Two neat new features for our Pro and Patron members today:

Clone a List: You can now clone and edit any public List with a single click. Cloning a List copies its name, films and tags to a new List under your account, with a reference back to the List from which it was cloned. From there you’re free to add, remove and re-order the films to your heart’s content.

Filter your Activity: If your activity stream is a little overwhelming, this might help. On a per-device/browser basis, Pro members can decide which types of activity appear in their main stream. The ‘Following’ tab under Activity has been replaced by an additional switch for all accounts to control whether your own activity appears in your stream. And we now generate activity for new Watchlist additions, by popular demand.

We’d love your feedback on these additions, and as always, there’s plenty more coming.

    Cloning.

    Two neat new features for our Pro and Patron members today:

    Clone a List: You can now clone and edit any public List with a single click. Cloning a List copies its name, films and tags to a new List under your account, with a reference back to the List from which it was cloned. From there you’re free to add, remove and re-order the films to your heart’s content.

    Filter your Activity: If your activity stream is a little overwhelming, this might help. On a per-device/browser basis, Pro members can decide which types of activity appear in their main stream. The ‘Following’ tab under Activity has been replaced by an additional switch for all accounts to control whether your own activity appears in your stream. And we now generate activity for new Watchlist additions, by popular demand.

    We’d love your feedback on these additions, and as always, there’s plenty more coming.

  • Partners.

Today we’re beyond thrilled to announce a partnership with The Dissolve, a fantastic new film criticism site from the team behind Pitchfork.

Beside each review on The Dissolve you’ll now find an embedded summary of activity from Letterboxd, which we automatically personalize if you’re signed in to our site. Signed-in members can rate the reviewed film, add or remove it from their Watchlist and see what their friends thought — directly on the page — and it’s a single click to review (or log) the film over on our site if you happen to have seen it.

This is the first of what will become multiple types of embedded content from Letterboxd. It’s not available beyond The Dissolve just yet, but if you have a popular site or blog that you’d like to include this sort of content on, please get in touch.

Read more about the announcement at The Dissolve.

New releases

For the past month we’ve been concentrating on improving our performance under load, and we hope you’re starting to see the benefits of that work. This is very much an ongoing effort, and we’re by no means done on this count.

Last week we also added a couple more options into the Visibility control (the ‘eye’ icon that appears beside the sort options on many pages): it’s now possible to filter out films you have (or have not) seen from said views, as well as to hide both short and unreleased films. We’ve retained (but renamed) the old behavior that faded posters for films you’ve watched, this is now available as ‘Fade Watched’. The new filters are smart, too: the ‘Hide Unreleased’ filter will automatically disable itself when you browse to the Upcoming Films page. In addition, we’ve added the ‘Netflix Availability’ filter (available to Pro members) into more pages, including in Lists!

And we’re pleased to finally have clobbered the issue that caused certain parts of our mobile site to render incorrectly on some Android and iOS 7 devices.

Stay tuned for a couple of nice features we’re readying for Pro and Patron members, more about those very soon.

    Partners.

    Today we’re beyond thrilled to announce a partnership with The Dissolve, a fantastic new film criticism site from the team behind Pitchfork.

    Beside each review on The Dissolve you’ll now find an embedded summary of activity from Letterboxd, which we automatically personalize if you’re signed in to our site. Signed-in members can rate the reviewed film, add or remove it from their Watchlist and see what their friends thought — directly on the page — and it’s a single click to review (or log) the film over on our site if you happen to have seen it.

    This is the first of what will become multiple types of embedded content from Letterboxd. It’s not available beyond The Dissolve just yet, but if you have a popular site or blog that you’d like to include this sort of content on, please get in touch.

    Read more about the announcement at The Dissolve.

    New releases

    For the past month we’ve been concentrating on improving our performance under load, and we hope you’re starting to see the benefits of that work. This is very much an ongoing effort, and we’re by no means done on this count.

    Last week we also added a couple more options into the Visibility control (the ‘eye’ icon that appears beside the sort options on many pages): it’s now possible to filter out films you have (or have not) seen from said views, as well as to hide both short and unreleased films. We’ve retained (but renamed) the old behavior that faded posters for films you’ve watched, this is now available as ‘Fade Watched’. The new filters are smart, too: the ‘Hide Unreleased’ filter will automatically disable itself when you browse to the Upcoming Films page. In addition, we’ve added the ‘Netflix Availability’ filter (available to Pro members) into more pages, including in Lists!

    And we’re pleased to finally have clobbered the issue that caused certain parts of our mobile site to render incorrectly on some Android and iOS 7 devices.

    Stay tuned for a couple of nice features we’re readying for Pro and Patron members, more about those very soon.

  • June.

    We made some changes last week in a number of areas. Here’s the goods on what’s new:

    Previously we supported viewing films by release year, genre and Netflix availability in somewhat of an ad-hoc manner, which often meant these filters weren’t offered together. We’ve remodelled the main Films section so that these filters (and more) can be applied together to narrow down your selections, and we’ve added more ways to sort the results.

    Instead of a Popular Films section, popularity is now just one of several ways to sort films. All visitors can filter the main Films section by decade, year or genre, and/or view only unreleased films based on US release date (or all films in our database at once, also not previously possible). Pro members can additionally throw Netflix availability into the mix. New sorting options (in addition to popularity) include by name and by release date. By combining a popularity search with the unreleased films filter, you can see the community’s most anticipated films.

    You may also have noticed we changed the “Hide films I’ve watched” control to match how the others work; this will enable us to add more options here in future, rather than it being a binary setting.

    In your Diary and Watchlist, we now offer more sorting options as well: you can sort by activity date, earliest/latest release date, your highest/lowest rating, film name, popularity or running time (as appropriate in each area).

    Elsewhere, we’ve made other small changes and improvements:

    • The Settings section has had an overhaul, and we’ve added the capability to manually refresh your Twitter avatar if you’ve connected to that service.
    • We added a shortcut in the poster menu to see what lists each film is included in.
    • All site notifications can be dismissed manually.
    • We’ve tightened up on which element attributes are permitted in HTML content (now it’s just href).
    • We fixed a bug where rewatched films weren’t removed from your Watchlist.
    • We fixed a bug where making a list private then public would cause it to re-appear as a recently published list.
  • Block.

As mentioned in our Community post, we’ve been working on a way to prevent another member from interacting with your Letterboxd account. From today, a ‘Blocking’ facility is available to all members, should you require it.

Each member’s Profile page now sports a flag icon beside the ‘Follow’ button, enabling you to block or report them. Blocking a member means you won’t see their content or actions on any pages we create especially for you on the site, including your homepage and Activity stream. Nor will they be able to comment on (or like) your content.

You may still see the content of a member you’ve blocked in public areas of the site, however if you feel that their content is generally inappropriate or otherwise contravenes our Community Policy, we encourage you to report the account using the ‘Report this account’ option, and let our moderators take appropriate action.

We’re hard at work on more good stuff — details soon.

    Block.

    As mentioned in our Community post, we’ve been working on a way to prevent another member from interacting with your Letterboxd account. From today, a ‘Blocking’ facility is available to all members, should you require it.

    Each member’s Profile page now sports a flag icon beside the ‘Follow’ button, enabling you to block or report them. Blocking a member means you won’t see their content or actions on any pages we create especially for you on the site, including your homepage and Activity stream. Nor will they be able to comment on (or like) your content.

    You may still see the content of a member you’ve blocked in public areas of the site, however if you feel that their content is generally inappropriate or otherwise contravenes our Community Policy, we encourage you to report the account using the ‘Report this account’ option, and let our moderators take appropriate action.

    We’re hard at work on more good stuff — details soon.

  • We almost forgot to mention here that the wonderful folks at Symbolset have added us to their sweet set of social icons. To be on the same page with those other names is a huge vote of confidence, and now there’s no excuse not to link up your Letterboxd profile page from your Tumblr (or wherever).

    We almost forgot to mention here that the wonderful folks at Symbolset have added us to their sweet set of social icons. To be on the same page with those other names is a huge vote of confidence, and now there’s no excuse not to link up your Letterboxd profile page from your Tumblr (or wherever).

  • Community.

    As any community grows, its ability to remain on an even keel is likely to be challenged. And while the vast majority of interaction on Letterboxd is respectful and good-natured, we’re aware that from time to time, members have stepped over the line from voicing opinion to lodging personal attacks.

    Today, as a first step, we’re introducing new tools to allow the community to help us. We have a plain-English Community Policy which can be summed up in two words: “Be cool”. Every review, list and comment now provides a mechanism to notify our community managers of inappropriate material. Content that steps over the line will be removed, and the responsible party or parties may have their ability to make comments temporarily suspended.

    Please use this facility, rather than feeding the trolls! We’ll be following it with the ability to block a member’s comments from appearing in any threads you choose to read. More on that soon.

    We have also added (finally!) the ability for members to edit and delete their own comments for a short while after posting, particularly to help with typos or badly formatted HTML. And we’ve made the following improvements:

    • Added the ability to remove ratings from the Diary page.
    • Added a link between Director and Actor pages for the same person.
    • Fixed an issue where the Diary page would show inconsistent rating values between its table and modal (edit) views.
    • Restored the creation of Activity for reviews that are added to older (existing) Diary entries.
    • Removed the ability to comment on Diary entries that have no review (unless there’s an existing thread).
    • Updated the way we post tweets (the previous method was unsupported by Twitter).
    • Removed some third-party code that was causing problems on Android devices.
    • Restored the ability to set Favorite Films from the mobile site.
    • Worked around a Chrome issue that caused the List template to appear misaligned.
    • Worked around an IE8 issue where the browser would ignore some of the site’s CSS.
    • Fixed an issue where usernames containing only numerals had inaccessible profile pages.
  • More.

A few more changes today we hope you’ll like…

Actor and director pages now show a photo and bio, if available on The Movie DB. We’ve increased the number of films displayed per page, and if you’re signed in, you can see the percentage of films you’ve seen for the person in question (it updates live as you mark films as watched, just like for lists).
Diary entries made for dates more than two weeks in the past no longer generate activity, which will make it easier on the followers of members with piles of ticket stubs to back-fill.
If you never (or seldom) use half-star ratings, your profile now displays the old five-bar histogram.
The film page now displays your friends’ reviews (if any) ahead of the most popular reviews from all members.
And we’ve fixed a bug that was incorrectly caching Netflix availability data for some members.
Additionally we’ve made one or two other minor tweaks which the eagle-eyed will no doubt spot. Your feedback on these and any other part of the site is welcome, as always.

    More.

    A few more changes today we hope you’ll like…

    • Actor and director pages now show a photo and bio, if available on The Movie DB. We’ve increased the number of films displayed per page, and if you’re signed in, you can see the percentage of films you’ve seen for the person in question (it updates live as you mark films as watched, just like for lists).
    • Diary entries made for dates more than two weeks in the past no longer generate activity, which will make it easier on the followers of members with piles of ticket stubs to back-fill.
    • If you never (or seldom) use half-star ratings, your profile now displays the old five-bar histogram.
    • The film page now displays your friends’ reviews (if any) ahead of the most popular reviews from all members.
    • And we’ve fixed a bug that was incorrectly caching Netflix availability data for some members.

    Additionally we’ve made one or two other minor tweaks which the eagle-eyed will no doubt spot. Your feedback on these and any other part of the site is welcome, as always.

  • Oscar.

    Happy Oscar day! We’ve just pushed a minor update to the site that addresses the following issues:

    • Review text edited directly from the Diary page now retains its paragraph formatting.
    • The Netflix controls in the poster’s Actions menu now behave as expected.
    • The importer now correctly respects the optional CreatedDate column.
    • Pro members’ 2012 Year in Review page now correctly displays all likes for films, and the diary count is now correct in all cases.
    • The popularity algorithm for Lists is now the same as for reviews.

    If you spot any problems around these changes, please let us know.

    And if you’d like to see how the Oscars would have panned out had our community been casting the votes, we’ve compiled the results for the four main film categories.

  • Pro.

Update The list limits that were part of our original announcement have been removed.

We’re thrilled to announce that after 15 months of public beta, Letterboxd is no longer invitation-only. Today, deep in the Letterboxd HQ bunker, we threw the switch to remove the invitation code requirement during sign-up: Letterboxd is now open to all!

During our invitation-only period we gained 40,000 members, who’ve jointly contributed more than 400,000 reviews, compiled 44,000 lists and added close to 8 million films to their online profiles. Thank you! We are humbled by your enthusiasm. Thanks for helping us to grow and improve Letterboxd, and for letting us become part of your life in film.

We’re really excited about the next steps, as we welcome new members to our community, and continue to improve the site. Which brings us to…

Letterboxd Pro

We’ve heard from many of you that you’d like to be able to support the site, so in the spirit of Maciej Cegłowski’s memorable post on the subject, now you can!

Allow us to introduce Letterboxd Pro. For US$19 per year, Pro members gain access to new features (see below), improved Netflix integration and data importers, and unlimited use of the site; as well as the opportunity to support Letterboxd as we build the best community of film lovers on the web.

We still love our free members. The site will continue to work for you just as before, with one exception: Netflix integration and data importers have both become Pro features. If you joined us during our beta period, your Netflix connection will continue to work.

For our most die-hard fans, we’re also offering a Patron membership level, which will get you listed as a Letterboxd Patron and earn you a drink on us if you’re ever in the vicinity of HQ. We hope you join us by upgrading your account today. If that’s not enough to entice you…

Your year in film

If you enjoyed our 2012 Year in Review, you’ll be pleased to know all Pro members get their own personalized “2012 Year in Review” page like this one.

For members who’ve kept an accurate diary for some or all of 2012, this is a terrific way to present your year in film (and if you haven’t, get cracking!). The page can also be customized with up to six of your own lists. (We’re working on a “Year in Progress” page as well, more on that soon.)

New importer

Our data import facility now supports a simple CSV format described here. In addition to populating lists, you can use the new importer to populate your Films, Diary, Ratings and Reviews pages, by including the appropriate columns in your import file. If any enterprising devs make this work with user scripts for popular services (for example), let us know and we’ll share your handiwork.

Hmmm… upgrades

Today also brings some further changes for all members. Many of you have asked for a way to show your Diary for a particular time period, and from today, you can filter by year, month, day or week (the year filter is in the header, the others you’ll find linked from relevant content in the Diary and elsewhere).

We’ve also added an option to filter your Diary (or Ratings page) by individual star rating, which will assist you in tracking down films you’ve logged but not rated. Check out those unicode URLs!

Based on your feedback, the Review field in the Add a Film panel now expands when focused, for a better writing experience, and the ratings histogram for a film (or a member’s films) now displays all ten possible values, instead of grouping them in pairs.

As always, get in touch if you have any feedback on these changes.

PS. We hate captchas, but they’re a necessary evil, so we’ve made our own based on completing film quotes. You should probably sign out and take a look.

    Pro.

    Update The list limits that were part of our original announcement have been removed.

    We’re thrilled to announce that after 15 months of public beta, Letterboxd is no longer invitation-only. Today, deep in the Letterboxd HQ bunker, we threw the switch to remove the invitation code requirement during sign-up: Letterboxd is now open to all!

    During our invitation-only period we gained 40,000 members, who’ve jointly contributed more than 400,000 reviews, compiled 44,000 lists and added close to 8 million films to their online profiles. Thank you! We are humbled by your enthusiasm. Thanks for helping us to grow and improve Letterboxd, and for letting us become part of your life in film.

    We’re really excited about the next steps, as we welcome new members to our community, and continue to improve the site. Which brings us to…

    Letterboxd Pro

    We’ve heard from many of you that you’d like to be able to support the site, so in the spirit of Maciej Cegłowski’s memorable post on the subject, now you can!

    Allow us to introduce Letterboxd Pro. For US$19 per year, Pro members gain access to new features (see below), improved Netflix integration and data importers, and unlimited use of the site; as well as the opportunity to support Letterboxd as we build the best community of film lovers on the web.

    We still love our free members. The site will continue to work for you just as before, with one exception: Netflix integration and data importers have both become Pro features. If you joined us during our beta period, your Netflix connection will continue to work.

    For our most die-hard fans, we’re also offering a Patron membership level, which will get you listed as a Letterboxd Patron and earn you a drink on us if you’re ever in the vicinity of HQ. We hope you join us by upgrading your account today. If that’s not enough to entice you…

    Your year in film

    If you enjoyed our 2012 Year in Review, you’ll be pleased to know all Pro members get their own personalized “2012 Year in Review” page like this one.

    For members who’ve kept an accurate diary for some or all of 2012, this is a terrific way to present your year in film (and if you haven’t, get cracking!). The page can also be customized with up to six of your own lists. (We’re working on a “Year in Progress” page as well, more on that soon.)

    New importer

    Our data import facility now supports a simple CSV format described here. In addition to populating lists, you can use the new importer to populate your Films, Diary, Ratings and Reviews pages, by including the appropriate columns in your import file. If any enterprising devs make this work with user scripts for popular services (for example), let us know and we’ll share your handiwork.

    Hmmm… upgrades

    Today also brings some further changes for all members. Many of you have asked for a way to show your Diary for a particular time period, and from today, you can filter by year, month, day or week (the year filter is in the header, the others you’ll find linked from relevant content in the Diary and elsewhere).

    We’ve also added an option to filter your Diary (or Ratings page) by individual star rating, which will assist you in tracking down films you’ve logged but not rated. Check out those unicode URLs!

    Based on your feedback, the Review field in the Add a Film panel now expands when focused, for a better writing experience, and the ratings histogram for a film (or a member’s films) now displays all ten possible values, instead of grouping them in pairs.

    As always, get in touch if you have any feedback on these changes.

    PS. We hate captchas, but they’re a necessary evil, so we’ve made our own based on completing film quotes. You should probably sign out and take a look.

  • 2012.

    At the end of our first full year, we thought it might be useful and fun to mine the data you’ve created in order to present a summary of 2012.

    Along with collective tallies of diary entries, lists, hours watched and the like, we also processed your ratings (from January 1 to December 21) in order to compute overall rankings for the year across a number of categories. To combat bias from films with smaller numbers of ratings, we used the same formula employed by IMDb for its Top 250 list, which weights films with fewer ratings slightly towards the mean rating for the site. To decide on a minimum number of required votes, we examined the frequency of ratings data and picked a cutoff that includes the top 20% of films rated by the community over the course of the year.

    A couple of notes on categories: documentaries are in their own category (so don’t appear in the Highest-Rated Films list). Elsewhere we’ve been a little more stringent in defining genres than the TMDb data allows, especially in the Horror category, which is applied quite liberally. And we’ve removed crossover films between genres too, so animated films don’t appear in sci-fi, for example. Lastly, the popular reviews summary is a selection from our most popular long-form reviews, with films and reviewers only allowed to appear in that section once each.

    A slight technical issue today means we’ve removed the poster menus from this page, but we’ll return them as soon as we can. If you want to add these films to your Watchlist, or otherwise interact with them, you can do so from the accompanying lists we’ve created for each category.

    A huge thank you from all of us at HQ for the life that you bring to the site every day. We are truly in awe of this community and it continues to delight and amuse us. Have a Merry Christmas, watch some films, and we’ll see you in the new year. We have some great stuff in store.

    The 2012 Year in Review in full.

  • Intermission #2.

    Until recently, Polish-born Marcin Wichary could be found at Google, where he spent time in several of the company’s key product groups, and assisted in the creation of many of its best-loved interactive Google doodles. Next year he joins Code for America as a fellow, a position that we trust won’t diminish his capacity for thoughtful, nuanced writing about trips to the cinema.

    In reply to one of his many helpful Letterboxd feedback emails, we snuck in a few questions for him.

    Marcin WicharySelf-portrait by Marcin Wichary

    What were your early cinema-going experiences like? Was there a seminal equivalent of The Goonies in Poland?
    One of my cousins was crazy tall for his age, and he managed to sneak us all into a theatre to watch an uncensored version of Superglina. I was eleven then, and I couldn’t sleep that night, deadly terrified of a bipedal enforcement droid from the movie standing in a doorway behind me, ready to blow me to pieces whenever I moved.

    SuperglinaElektronikzny Morderca

    So, yeah, of course I am talking about RoboCop. The tickets were pricey and the theatres far away, so movie-going was reserved for big, impressive productions. All these came from Hollywood, although with baffling, bespoke posters, and equally creative new titles (Superglina means “supercop”, The Terminator was an “electronic assassin”, and Die Hard would translate back to “glass trap”, which of course caused problems with the sequels).

    You seem to have an affinity for 80s films in general, judging by their representation in your lists.
    I’m fascinated with computer and technology history — particularly the 80s, which is when the general public was introduced to home computers and robots. And while I will forever applaud WarGames for its realism, the romantic scene with Virginia Madsen playing cello against the computer from Electric Dreams, or the most annoying robot ever from Deadly Friend, can tell you just as much about public perception, fears, and hopes involved with new technologies.

    I read that you’re a fan of Stanisław Lem. Do you prefer Tarkovsky’s adaptation of Solaris or Soderbergh’s?
    I have yet to finish the apathetic former, and I couldn’t get past the latter rewriting so much. But if you’re in love with the source, you can’t really win, can you? The book has a chapter with the protagonist sitting in a doggone library, leafing through academic papers. How on Earth, futuristic or contemporary, can you film that?

    Actually, about a year ago, I teamed up with an illustrator to work on a Stanisław Lem Google doodle, which was essentially a five-minute interactive animated movie. It took us forever, and required a lot of really tough decisions I did not expect. If anything, that gave me a lot of respect towards people who squeeze visual narratives out of words for a living.

    You’ve famously sought out the landmark building from your favorite film. Do you only stalk inanimate objects?
    As a teenager I visited Lem himself once, in his house in Cracow. It was foolish, but arguably rather necessary for my continued well-being. But one of my favorite moments was actually an anti-stalk. A few years back, I was visiting my friend at Industrial Light & Magic (which, if you love movies, is more fun than visiting Hollywood itself). And, in the company store, he starts elbowing me and pointing towards the entrance. Turns out, who else is there, but not George Lucas himself?

    My first thoughts on what to do were exclusively restraining order-inviting, but then I realized this was Lucas’s place of work, and I shouldn’t really behave like a common fanboy. So, I just looked at him, and made one very slow, respectful nod. After a second, he did the same. It was pretty legendary. People are still talking about it.

    What film is your guiltiest pleasure?
    Two-dimensional worlds are easy to love. I can not only watch Rocky IV on repeat, but there is no way for me to get through the ‘No Easy Way Out’ montage without rewinding it a few times.

    I mean, hypothetically.

    Christopher Livingston wrote recently about the films he’d always watch if he coincided with them on TV. What would make your list?
    I suppose all of those movies I don’t remember watching the first time. Or second. The movies that were just always there. Both parts of Die Hard, which Polish TV was fond of playing every Christmas. Some of the Police Academies — cheap and horrible, but my Dad loved them. Tango & Cash (I rounded up different Polish translations once and in typical case of Internet serendipity, someone actually made a master’s thesis out of it later). The Blues Brothers, forever responsible for the Pavlovian humming of the Peter Gunn theme whenever I’m driving in Chicago. And Ghostbusters II, on a grand-grand-grand-copy of a close-captioned VHS tape, which I learned a lot of English from, and I will argue to my death is far superior to the original.

    Spielberg or Scorsese?
    Meh. Fincher! It was actually through Letterboxd that I realized he must be my favorite director, since I watched all, and liked most of his movies. The making ofs and interviews, the attention to detail, the certain relentlessness toward movie-making he exhibits is very inspiring.

    I also have a soft spot for mainstream action directors. Michael Bay, Michael Mann, the late Tony Scott — I don’t actually like very many of their movies, but I admire their body of work and where they’re trying to go with it. On my business card while at Google, my title said “the Michael Bay of doodles”, which was half-hopeful, half-cautionary.

    Do you have a favorite Letterboxd review you wish you’d written?
    I’m going to pick Morgan Nichol’s review of Mission: Impossible — Ghost Protocol because it’s unpretentious, clever, funny, incisive, and meandering in all the right proportions.

    Come to think of it, kind of how I like my movies.

    Our thanks to Marcin from his many fans at HQ.

  • Wow. A quote from Ian Woolstencroft’s review of American Mary has made it onto one of the film’s promotional posters. Regrettably Ian is not credited as the author of the remark, but we’re chuffed to have contributed to getting his comment out there. Thanks to Scott Weinberg for the tip.

    Wow. A quote from Ian Woolstencroft’s review of American Mary has made it onto one of the film’s promotional posters. Regrettably Ian is not credited as the author of the remark, but we’re chuffed to have contributed to getting his comment out there. Thanks to Scott Weinberg for the tip.

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